Spanish Spoken Here?

No matter how strong your Spanish-language skills, native, near native or beginner, it behooves you to read through the following information, as Argentinean and especially porteño Spanish is most certainly not your garden variety: for starters, most speakers are  struck by the different pronunciation of the "y" and "ll", which in most parts of Argentina sound like a soft "zj". And it doesn’t stop there…

Lunfardo and Argentinean Spanish

Lunfardo, spoken in Buenos Aires, is typically the tongue of the poor immigrants in Buenos Aires, who mixed Spanish grammar with their native tongue. Although it cannot be considered widely understood or a major "Argentinean dialect," a considerable number of lunfardo words have slipped into normal Argentinean use.

Local Lingo

PEOPLE

 

Pibe
Chico
Nene
Viejo/a
Porteño
Boludo
Pelotudo
Tarado

kid/guy
kid
kid
lit: Old man/old woman, used for father and mother
Inhabitant of the city of Buenos Aires
“jerk”, “asshole”, mostly used friendly between friends
idem
“dumbass”, normally no friendly use

CLOTHING

 

Campera
Saco
Calzoncillo
Bombacha
Remera
Pollera

Leather jacket or coat
Suit jacket
Mens´ underwear
Womens´ underwear
T-shirt
Skirt

FOOD

 

Dulce de leche

Alfajores

Churros
Masitas
Garapiñada
Pochoclo
Bife de Chorizo

Mate


Bombilla

Typical Argentinean caramel spread, made of milk and sugar, often found in pastries

Filled, chocolate covered cookies.

Typical pastries, often filled with “dulce de leche” 

Typical pastries of all sorts

Peanuts covered with sugar or chocolate
Popcorn
Tenderloin steak (and that means TENDER in Argentina!)

Herb tea, made from a native shrub called "yerba", cultivated and drunk extensively Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. 

The metal straw you drink “mate” with.

EXPRESSIONS

 

Estar en pedo
No dar bolilla
Afanar
Bancar
Laburar
No tener ni la pálida idea
Guita

Be drunk
To ignore
To rob
To put up with
To work
Not have a clue

Money

PET PHRASES

 

Ché



¿Viste?

Bárbaro
Regio
Bacán
¿Qué onda?

Used as both at the end of phrases and to address people informally, it means something like “you”. Ernesto “Ché” Guevarra got his nickname because he used it so much among his fellow Cuban guerilla fighters.
Pronounced very often at the end of phrases, it means literally: “understood?”
“Great!”, “perfect”
“Great!”, “perfect”
“Great!”, “perfect”
Something like “What’s up?”

El Voseo

The use of “vos” instead of “tú” (you the informal) is common in both the Río de la Plata region and parts of Central America, but the conjugation of the corresponding verbs is a little different. In Argentina it derives from the “vosotros” form (which is otherwise not used as in all Latin American countries).

Examples:

Present tense

Tú tienes          Vos tenés

Tú eres            Vos sos

Tú vienes         Vos venís

 

Commands (Imperative)

Anda                Andá

Come               Comé

Ven                  Vení

Siéntate            Sentate

Sírvete             Servite

 

Read more at: http://www.spanishsinfronteras.com.ar/lunfardo.html
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